Archive of iPad Rumors

Apple's new low-cost sixth-generation iPad with Apple Pencil support has likely spurred many new customers to adopt an iPad or upgrade from an older model. At just $329, the new iPad is much more affordable than the iPad Pro, making it easier than ever to get your hands on a tablet that works with the Apple Pencil.

For new iPad owners, we've rounded up a handful of apps that are well worth checking out if you want to use your iPad for creative tasks like photo editing, sketching, video editing, drawing, and more, plus we've thrown in some useful productivity apps.

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  • Affinity Photo ($19.99) - Affinity Photo is a desktop-class photo editing app that's available on the iPad, and it's a useful app for both photo editing and drawing with support for unlimited layers, photo adjustment tools, filters, retouching, and more. It requires a powerful processor, so it's only compatible with the iPad Air 2, the 5th and 6th-generation iPads, and iPad Pro models, and you can use the iPad for drawing and selectively editing. Affinity Photo isn't cheap, but if you want one of the best photo editing tools you can get on the iPad, it's worth checking out.

  • Procreate ($9.99) - Procreate is a popular and well-known sketching, drawing, and painting app. Because it's been available on the iPad for years, the Procreate team has had a lot of time to make improvements and refinements to the app, making it the go to for many artists who work on the iPad. It has been optimized for Apple Pencil, so you can create works of art with Apple's stylus. It features customizable brushes, support for layers, and a 64-bit painting engine that supports high-resolution artwork. If you want to draw or paint on your iPad, Procreate is one of the apps to check out.

  • LumaFusion ($19.99) - If you want to edit video on the iPad but want something more than iMovie, LumaFusion is a powerful video editing option that you'll want to take a look at. Using LumaFusion, you can do everything you might do with a desktop app, like trimming clips, adding in transitions, correcting color, adding effects, using slow-motion, fast forward, and reverse, and adding titles, audio, and more.

  • Astropad ($29.99) - Astropad is a unique app that's designed to turn your iPad into a graphics tablet for your Mac, so you can use it like a Wacom tablet or similar device. With Astropad, you can draw on your iPad with Apple Pencil and your drawings will be sent over to your Mac wirelessly. It works with any Mac app, including Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, Affinity Photo, and Pixelmator.

  • Copied (Free) - Copied is a useful productivity app that can be used to save snippets of text that you've copied on the iPad, letting you keep track of text, links images, and more. Snippets you've saved can be easily inserted into new documents, and on the iPad, Copied supports full drag and drop functionality and multitasking, so saving information is as simple as dragging it from your current app to Copied.
What are your favorite apps for the iPad that new users should check out? Let us know in the comments.
Apple today shared new iPad tutorial videos on its YouTube channel, which appear to be aimed at customers who have purchased the new sixth-generation iPad with Apple Pencil support. Apple has also aggregated all of the videos on an iPad how to website.

The first video, which is a minute long, focuses on using the Instant Markup feature that's designed to allow users to draw on and annotate screenshots on the iPad. The tutorial walks through every step of the process, from capturing a screenshot on iPad using the Home button and the power button to using the Apple Pencil to mark it up to sharing the finished product.


Apple's second tutorial video covers Split View multitasking to use two apps at the same time. The video instructs users on accessing the dock to open two apps at the same time, and then it covers drag and drop techniques.


Several other unlisted tutorial videos cover features like using the iPad's keyboard, using the Files app, working with multiple emails, and sketching in the Notes app.








Apple has shared several tutorial videos like this in the past, which are often tied to new releases. Tutorial videos can typically be found on the separate Apple Support YouTube channel, but these new tutorial videos are on the company's main channel for new iPad owners.

The new sixth-generation iPad went on sale last week after its debut at Apple's March 27 educational event. The new tablet, which is priced at $329, boasts a new A10 Fusion processor and support for the Apple Pencil.
iFixit today published its teardown of Apple's sixth-generation, education-focused iPad and found that -- unsurprisingly -- the tablet shares many of the internals of the fifth-gen iPad. The teardown crew also looked at the new iPad's potential for durability and repairability in an education environment by comparing it to competitors in the field.

Images via iFixit

The new iPad's lack of waterproofing, non-replaceable charging port, zero upgradeability, and use of glue throughout the internals added up to a "repair nightmare." iFixit then pointed towards the HP Elite x2 1012 G1 tablet, which got a perfect repairability score of 10 out of 10, summarizing that "Apple's 'education' iPad is still a case of won't — not can't."

Looking into the iPad's internals, the two major updates in the new tablet are an upgraded A10 processor and Broadcom chips for Apple Pencil support. iFixit got a peek inside the iPad using Creative Electron's X-ray imaging software, discovering "only minor differences" when compared to a similar X-ray of the previous iPad.


One of the iPad's advantages in terms of repairability comes in the form of its digitizer panel easily separating from the display. iFixit pointed out that in the event that either component should break, repair will be easier for schools and educators.
In the education space, Apple has some stiff competition in the form of low-cost, Google-powered laptops. How does this iPad, er, stack up against a Chromebook from HP or Asus? Given that schoolkids can be a bit rough on their electronics, here's an iFixit take on it:

iPad's glued-glass display is more vulnerable to drops. Thankfully, this is the one iPad that retains an air-gapped digitizer panel—not as visually impressive as other recent iPads, but it's much cheaper to replace cracked glass that isn't LOCA-bonded to the display panel underneath. Separate accessories like the keyboard and Pencil add to the cost and are easier to lose—but are also easier to replace if damaged. (Note the missing key on our HP's keyboard.)
Eventually, iFixit got down to the logic board and discovered the iPad's A10 Fusion processor and two Broadcom touch screen controller chips, previously found in the 10.5-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pro models. iFixit theorized that the new iPad's Apple Pencil support "comes in part thanks to this "Pro"-grade chip."


The sixth-gen iPad has the same battery as the previous model, with 32.9 Wh capacity. iFixit noted that while this allows Apple to reuse existing manufacturing lines to reduce waste, the battery is still locked behind a "repair-impeding adhesive" that greatly reduced the iPad's repairability score. Apple has provided easy battery removal before, in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, but iFixit hasn't seen anything like it since.

Ultimately, iFixit gave the 2018 iPad a repairability score of 2 out of 10, favoring the fairly easy repair options of its air-gapped, non-fused display and digitizer glass, but taking marks off for its heavy use of adhesive and sticky tape. To read the full teardown, visit iFixit.com.
Apple's March event, held last week, focused on a new sixth-generation iPad aimed at the educational market. The device, which went on sale following the event and became available in retail stores on Friday, is an upgraded version of the fifth-generation iPad with one important new feature - support for the Apple Pencil.

We picked up one of Apple's new $329 tablets over the weekend and tested it out to give MacRumors readers considering a purchase a closer look at the new device.

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Design wise, the sixth-generation iPad doesn't look any different from the fifth-generation iPad. It's the same thickness as the original iPad Air (aka thicker than the iPad Pro and the iPad Air 2), and it has the same non-laminated display to keep costs down.

That display is equipped with a new touch sensor, though, which enables it to work with the $99 Apple Pencil. Using the Apple Pencil on the new iPad is essentially identical to using it on an iPad Pro, with the accessory offering a smooth writing experience with no jitters or lag.

Inside, the new iPad is equipped with an A10 Fusion processor, which isn't quite as powerful as the processor in the iPad Pro, Apple's flagship tablet, but it's a solid improvement over the A9 in the fifth-generation model. This is the same processor that's in the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, and it's going to be viable for apps and games for several years to come.

Compared to the iPad Pro, the new iPad has a lower-quality display and lower-quality cameras (8MP vs 12MP at rear, 1.2MP vs 7MP in front) along with the slower processor, but if you don't need those features, the sixth-generation iPad is a fantastic tablet for its price point and an affordable way to get a device with Apple Pencil support.

Apple sells the new iPad for $329, and it's available from the online Apple Store and Apple retail stores. The Apple Pencil is sold separately for $99.

Apple plans to discount the sixth-generation iPad to $299 for schools, which will make it an attractive option. The Apple Pencil will be available for $89, and Logitech also plans to sell a lower-cost Apple Pencil-style stylus called Crayon to schools for $49.

For more information on the new iPad, including a comparison chart that pits it against the 10.5-inch iPad Pro and the fifth-generation iPad, make sure to check out our dedicated iPad roundup.
Apple's new sixth-generation iPad is available in Apple retail stores starting today, which means customers who are aiming to get one of the new tablets can check stock and arrange for an in-store pickup using Apple's online tools.

A stock check using the in-store pickup option suggests the new iPad is readily available at most Apple Stores in the United States, with plenty for walk-in customers who want to snag one of the affordable new tablets or check one out before purchasing.


Priced starting at $329, the iPad comes in 32GB and 128GB configurations, with both WiFi only and WiFi + Cellular options available. It's available in Silver, Space Gray, and a new shade of Gold.

Apple first announced the iPad at an event in Chicago on Tuesday and began taking orders for the device on that day.


The new iPad is Apple's first tablet aside from the iPad Pro to offer full support for the Apple Pencil, which makes it an attractive option for customers who want the functionality of the Apple Pencil without the iPad Pro's price tag.


It also comes equipped with an upgraded A10 Fusion processor, so it's a good deal faster than the fifth-generation iPad. While it does have a Retina display, compared to the iPad Pro, it is lacking several advanced display options like ProMotion technology, True Tone, wide color support, and more.

Customers who purchased an iPad earlier this week should be seeing deliveries soon, as the tablets have been shipped out and are set to be delivered starting today.
The price of the new sixth-generation iPad didn't change in the United States compared to the previous fifth-generation model, but prices for the new tablet have been lowered in several other countries around the world.

Prior to the launch of the new iPad, rumors had suggested it could be priced as low as $259 in the United States, which did not happen, but the price has indeed dropped slightly in multiple countries.


In the UK, for example, the entry-level fifth-generation iPad was priced at £339, with the new sixth-generation model available for £319.

In Canada, the fifth-generation 32GB iPad cost $449, while the equivalent sixth-generation model is now available for $429.

In Germany, France, and other European countries, the new iPad is priced starting at €349 to €369, down from €399 to €419. Prices appear to be lower in most, if not all European countries.

Prices have not changed in all countries where the new iPad is available. In New Zealand and Australia, for example, prices remain unchanged, starting at A$469 and NZ$539, respectively. Prices have also not shifted in some Asian countries, including Japan, Singapore, and Korea, but prices are lower in others like China, and Thailand.

In the United States, the entry-level 32GB sixth-generation iPad is priced at $329, the price as the fifth-generation model. A 128GB version is available for $429, while Wi-Fi + Cellular models can be purchased for an additional $130 over the standard Wi-Fi only price.
To go along with the new sixth-generation iPad, Apple announced two accessories designed by Logitech -- a $99 Rugged iPad Keyboard Case and a unique $49 Crayon Stylus that shares many characteristics with the Apple Pencil.


The Crayon Stylus looks similar to the Apple Pencil, with a slim aluminum body and an Apple Pencil-style tip. Interestingly, Logitech's website says that the Crayon has been designed for and is compatible with the 6th-generation iPad, suggesting it's not going to work with the iPad Pro.


iMore's Serenity Caldwell was able to get a bit more information on the Crayon from Logitech, and it turns out it's using the same technology as the Apple Pencil. It has the same latency, tilt, and palm rejection features as the Apple Pencil, but there is no pressure sensitivity.

The Crayon connects to the iPad via a single frequency and does not use Bluetooth, and it will last for up to 8 hours before needing to be recharged via an included Lightning port, much like the one on the Apple Pencil. Crayon works with all of the apps that support the Apple Pencil.

Just press the on button and start writing or drawing on iPad right away -- it's that easy. Logitech Crayon connects to iPad instantly with no complex device pairing or other delays.
There was speculation ahead of Apple's event that a lower-cost Apple Pencil might be in the works given the $99 price point of Apple's device, and it appears that we did indeed get that, but from a third-party manufacturer. Students who have a sixth-generation iPad will be able to use the Crayon or the Apple Pencil with the tablet.


Compared to the Apple Pencil, the Logitech Crayon has a more kid-friendly design with a pry-resistant smart tip that requires a special tool when the tip needs replacing. The rubber cap at the end that covers the Lightning connector is also tethered to the Crayon so it doesn't get lost.


It's not entirely clear why the Crayon is not backwards compatible with iPad Pro models, and we've asked Logitech for clarification.

Logitech does not plan to release the Crayon to the public at this time, with the accessory limited to teachers. Teachers will be able to purchase it for $49 starting this summer.
Apple didn't live stream today's education-focused event held at Lane Tech College Prep High School in Chicago, but the company has made a video available in the Events app of the Apple TV now that it's over.

The video spans an hour and seven minutes, and while Apple mainly focused on educational topics, it does include the unveiling of the new low-cost $329 sixth-generation iPad, which comes equipped with Apple Pencil support.


Apple has not yet made the event available to watch on its website, but a video should be uploaded and available soon, and a direct link to the video is available here. A YouTube version may also come later in the day.

In addition to its main event, Apple has shared several new iPad-focused YouTube videos that were shown during the Chicago event.


The first video, above, focuses on the Apple Pencil being used to draw the new iPad, highlighting Apple Pencil integration in the low-cost tablet. The other two videos focus on students using the new iPad for school work and Apple's commitment to education.



In addition to a new low-cost iPad with Apple Pencil support, Apple today also introduced new tools for teachers and students, including a Classwork app for assignments, a ClassKit API for creating educational apps with Classwork integration, new Apple Pencil capabilities for iWork, and an "Everyone Can Create" curriculum that's similar to "Everyone Can Code" but is more focused on creative pursuits like photography, video making, music, and art.

Don't want to watch Apple's full hour-long presentation? We'll have a recap coming soon that covers all of the interesting points of the event, so stay tuned for that.

Update: The full video is now available on Apple's Events website.
Apple today reduced the price of AppleCare+ for 9.7-inch iPad and iPad mini models to $69 in the United States, down from $99.


AppleCare+ was previously $99 for any iPad, but that price now applies to iPad Pro models only. The lower $69 price for the iPad and iPad mini has been offered by select Best Buy stores for the past several months.

AppleCare+ is an optional warranty plan that extends an iPad's or iPad mini's warranty period to two years from the original purchase date of the device, and adds up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $49 plus applicable taxes in the United States.

AppleCare+ for iPad also provides 24/7 priority access to support advisors via online chat or phone for up to two years after the device's original purchase date. Without the plan, iPad owners are covered by Apple's limited one-year warranty and an initial 90 days of complimentary telephone support.

Apple charges out-of-warranty repair fees of $299 for the iPad mini 3 and iPad mini 4 and $249 for most 9.7-inch iPad models, including the sixth-generation model introduced at its education event today. By comparison, the upfront cost of AppleCare+ for iPad plus one incidental fee is $118, so the warranty can pay for itself.

AppleCare+ pricing for 9.7-inch iPad and iPad mini models has also been reduced in other countries, including Australia, Canada, Singapore, and the United Kingdom. Prices vary based on local currencies.

(Thanks, Christian!)
Following the announcement and launch of Apple's new 9.7-inch iPad, a few websites have gotten hands-on time with the tablet and shared their thoughts online this afternoon. The initial consensus appears to be that while the iPad isn't very surprising in terms of form factor and features, it's a solid entry-level model that benefits from added Apple Pencil support.

Engadget said the new iPad is "as fluid and fast as the iPad Pro," which it described as an "impressive feat." The site said the iPad has a great screen, although it isn't as sharp as the iPad Pro's display. Engadget also pointed out the air gap between the display and cover glass on the new tablet, and its lack of the higher-end iPad Pro's True Tone color correction feature and 120Hz ProMotion refresh rate.

Image via Engadget
Following today's education-focused presentation in Chicago, we got a chance to pick up the new tablet for ourselves and, well, it's just about the same as last year's model. That's not a bad thing -- it still feels as solid and well-built as ever. The biggest change is Apple Pencil support, and after a brief test it feels almost as fluid and fast as the iPad Pro, which is an impressive feat.
The Verge began its hands-on coverage by stating the new iPad is "very familiar," with all of the expected screen size, bezels, Touch ID sensor, button placement, and cameras users have come to expect from Apple's tablet line. The Verge said the display was "vibrant and responsive," and the site got to mess around with an AR demo, which was "as good as any AR demo" it has seen.

Image via The Verge

The Verge also pointed out that Apple's demo area was not really "focused on the hardware," but instead software demos that showed real-world use in the classroom, with Tim Cook walking around and discussing the new announcement with reporters.
We just spent some time with Apple’s new $329 iPad, announced here in Chicago at its education event. It’s... an iPad. Holding and using an iPad, it feels very much like an iPad! The air gap on the screen is the same as before — large by iPad Pro standards, but only iPad Pro people will really turn their nose up at it. Same goes for the screen overall, which doesn’t have all the True Tone magic of the Pro, but is nevertheless vibrant and responsive.

I checked out a quick demo of an AR classroom app and was as good as any AR demo I’ve seen. Not knock-your-socks-off good, but it didn’t lag and the baby elephant stayed put right on the table where it was placed. Obviously we’ll need to spend more time to say for sure, but the A10 Fusion processor certainly seems up to most tasks.
Besides the new iPad, Apple today announced that its Classroom app will be coming to Mac this June, revealed a new "Schoolwork" app, showed off iWork updates for iOS, and more. New accessories and devices have also emerged on Apple.com following the Field Trip keynote, including standalone Space Gray color options for the Magic Keyboard, Magic Mouse 2, and Magic Trackpad 2.
Apple today announced an all-new 9.7-inch iPad, describing the tablet as its "most affordable iPad" yet and confirming it will work with the Apple Pencil. Apple said that the device was designed for powerful AR apps.

The tablet has a 9.7-inch Retina display that features a higher-resolution touch sensor to enable support for Apple Pencil, previously only compatible with iPad Pro. Apple Pencil provides a "fluid and natural" drawing experience with sensors that measure pressure and tilt so that users can take notes or illustrate in various apps.


The new iPad has an A10 Fusion chip with 64-bit desktop-class architecture, providing 40 percent faster CPU and 50 percent faster graphics performance when compared to the previous generation 9.7-inch iPad. Apple said that both front and rear cameras provide HD video recording for everything from document scanning to FaceTime calls.

One of the main applications aimed at the new iPad is augmented reality, fueled by the device's Retina display, powerful chip, enhanced cameras, and advanced sensors with a gyroscope and accelerometer. The tablet was built for mobility and durability for students, sporting an aluminum unibody construction.


The 32GB iPad with Wi-Fi is priced at $329 in the U.S. and $459 for the Wi-Fi + Cellular model, and Apple Pencil can be purchased separately for $99. Schools will be able to buy iPad for $299 and Apple Pencil for $89. The new iPad is available to order beginning today and will arrive in stores later this week in more than 25 countries, listed below:

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UAE, the UK, the US, India, Russia, Thailand, and Turkey. More countries and regions will follow in April, with South Korea and others coming in May.
Apple during its education-focused event in Chicago today announced that its existing iOS "Classroom" app will be making the move to Mac, beginning with a beta this June.


Classroom is a "teaching assistant" that helps teachers manage their students' iPads, as well as guide kids through lessons, keep them on track, and share their work. Using the app, teachers can launch apps, books, and websites on all student devices simultaneously, and send or receive documents. Classroom also allows teachers to view their students' screens so that they "stay focused," and other administrative options like password resets.


At the same time, the company revealed a new cloud-based app called "Schoolwork" that lets teachers assign handouts and track the progress of their students. Apple said that Schoolwork "builds on the success" of the Classroom app and both apps will be combined to help educators "get the most out of integrating Apple technology into schools."
“Creativity sparks a deeper level of engagement in students, and we’re excited to help teachers bring out that creativity in the classroom,” said Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Marketing.

“When you combine the power of iPad, the creativity of Apple Pencil, over a million iPad apps in the App Store, the rich curriculum in Everyone Can Code and Everyone Can Create, and unique Classroom and Schoolwork apps that support students and help schools manage technology in the classroom, we believe we can amplify learning and creativity in a way that only Apple can.”
Using Schoolwork, teachers will be able to make handouts that include PDFs, links, and other documents, as well as check in on the progress of every student for a specific assignment. Schoolwork will integrate with third-party apps using Apple's ClassKit API, acting as a hub of sorts for a classroom's projects and assignments. Schoolwork will be available for teachers in June.

There will also be a new "Apple Teacher" professional learning program available online, aimed at helping teachers build skills, chart their progress, and get inspired to launch new lesson plans. The program will allow teachers to earn badges shaped like gold stars, encouraging them to continue using the program and evolve their classroom.