Archive of iPad Rumors

Apple today quietly updated its lineup of older iPads, increasing the minimum storage on the iPad Air 2, the iPad mini 4, and the iPad mini 2 and lowering the prices of the maximum storage tier. The iPad Pro has also been updated with new pricing options, with Apple making storage increases more affordable.

The iPad Air 2 is now available in 32 and 128GB configurations, priced at $399 and $499, respectively, for the WiFi only models. Previously, Apple offered a 16GB model for $399 and a 64GB model for $499. Cellular models continue to be priced at $130 more than WiFi models.

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The iPad mini 4 is now available in 32GB and 128GB configurations at the same price point as the iPad Air 2, $399 and $499. Apple previously sold a 16GB iPad mini 4 for $399, a 64GB model for $499, and a 128GB model for $599.

The iPad mini 2 is now only available in a 32GB capacity, priced at $269. Apple has done away with the 16GB model and has dropped the price of the new 32GB model to the price the 16GB model used to be sold at.

As for the iPad Pro, Apple has dropped the prices on higher storage tiers by up to $100. Pricing on the iPad Pro is as follows:

12.9-inch
32GB - $799
128GB - $899 (was $949)
256GB - $999 (was $1099)
128GB Cellular - $1029 (was $1079)
256GB Cellular - $1129 (was $1229)

9.7-inch
32GB - $599
128GB - $699 (was $749)
256GB - $799 (was $899)
32GB Cellular - $729
128GB Cellular - $829 (was $879)
256GB Cellular - $929 (was $1029)

The new iPad pricing is available immediately on iPads purchased from the online Apple Store, the Apple Store app, and Apple's retail locations.
Noted analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has released a new research report outlining his expectations for the future of Apple's iPad lineup, predicting three new iPads ranging from 9.7 inches to 12.9 inches to be released in 2017.

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According to Kuo, Apple is aiming to introduce a new 10.5-inch iPad Pro model next year to go along with a 12.9-inch iPad Pro 2 and a "low-cost" 9.7-inch iPad model. Kuo makes no mention about the fate of the current 7.9-inch iPad mini, although many have assumed that model may be phased out as the recent 5.5-inch iPhone "Plus" models have helped lessen demand for Apple's smallest tablet.
We expect three new iPads (12.9” iPad Pro 2, new size 10.5” iPad Pro & low-cost 9.7” iPad) to be launched in 2017, though this may not drive shipment growth amid structural headwinds; 2017F shipments to fall 10-20% YoY. If the iPad comes in a larger size, such as a 10.5” model, we believe it will be helpful to bid for tenders within the commercial and education markets. As a result, we expect Apple to launch a 10.5” iPad Pro in 2017. In addition, we estimate the 12.9” iPad Pro 2 and 10.5” iPad Pro will adopt the A10X processor, with TSMC (2330 TT, NT$177.5, N) being the sole supplier using 10nm process technology. The low-cost 9.7” model may adopt the A9X processor, which is also exclusively supplied by TSMC.
Looking even further ahead, Kuo predicts "revolutionary" changes for the iPad lineup for 2018 "at the earliest," with Apple making "radical" changes to the iPad's design and shifting to an AMOLED display.
Revolutionary iPad model likely to be introduced in 2018F at the earliest, with radical changes in form factor design & user behavior on adoption of flexible AMOLED panel. We believe iPad will follow in the footsteps of the iPhone by adopting AMOLED panel in 2018F at the earliest. If Apple can truly tap the potential of a flexible AMOLED panel, we believe the new iPad model will offer new selling points through radical form factor design and user behavior changes, which could benefit shipments.
Kuo remains conservative in his predictions of iPad shipments, cutting his total 2016 shipment forecast from 45–50 million to 35–40 million due in large part to a lack of new models before the end of the year. Even with updated models in 2017, however, Kuo predicts shipments will continue to decline as part of general trends in the tablet market.
Crashes, and subsequent fatalities, of small private planes have "fallen to the lowest levels in decades" thanks to mobile devices that give pilots "much better weather information" than a few years ago, along with other benefits. These devices mainly include Apple's iPad lineup and, in 2015, helped contribute to the lowest rate of fatal crashes ever recorded by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration: 1.03 fatal accidents per 100,000 flight hours (via Bloomberg).

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As pointed out by John Hansman, an astronautics and aeronautics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the data should be "approached with care," due to the fact that there is far less information and data available on general aviation as opposed to commercial flights. Private airplane flights per year have also decreased, which would help lessen the overall chance for accidents in the first place. Still, the new data collected "jibes with broad new efforts to improve safety in that arena," according to Hansman.
“It’s encouraging,” said Hansman, who has studied private-aircraft safety data. “There are reasons to think it might be accurate. There’s a lot of things happening in the system that are slowly making it better.”
In reaction to these accidents, the FAA and the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board moved to bolster each private aircraft pilot's safety levels, leading to the official approval of "weather and other programs for mobile devices." To improve the regulation of these aircrafts, the two administrations also approved ways to make it easier to add safety equipment to planes, including devices that warn of engine failure and the impending loss of control of the plane.
iPad-Pro-9-7-inchApple today released a new version of iOS 9.3.2 that's specific to the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, presumably resolving an issue that caused some iPad Pro devices to become bricked after installing the original iOS 9.3.2 update.

The new version of iOS 9.3.2, build 13F72, can be downloaded over-the-air on any 9.7-inch iPad Pro that has not previously been updated to the latest version of iOS 9.

iOS 9.3.2 was originally released to the public on Monday, May 16, but shortly after it came out, we began receiving complaints that the update was bricking some 9.7-inch iPad Pro devices with an "error 56" message.

Later in the week, Apple pulled the iOS 9.3.2 update for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro and advised customers who had been affected by the error to contact Apple support. No simple fix was available, and some users who were impacted by the bug had their iPad Pro devices replaced by Apple.

Alongside the removal of the iOS 9.3.2 update, Apple said it was working on a fix and would release a new version of iOS 9.3.2 "as quickly as possible."

The launch of a new version of iOS 9.3.2 suggests the issue is now resolved, and with a fix in place, the next version of the iOS 9.3.3 beta may also be seeded to 9.7-inch iPad Pro users. Released earlier last week, the first iOS 9.3.3 beta was not available for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, presumably because the bug had not yet been fixed.

Update:Apple has published a support document outlining the steps to take if the error 56 message shows up when attempting to update a 9.7-inch iPad Pro from iOS 9.3 or iOS 9.3.1 to iOS 9.3.2 or later. Error 56 will require restoring through iTunes.

9.7-inch iPad Pro users may run into a related issue asking them to disconnect or turn off the iPad Pro during the update, which Apple also covers in the document.
After discovering that a handful of iPhone SE components are interchangeable with those of the iPhone 5 in a teardown last week, iFixit today shifted its sights to the other major release from Apple's "Let Us Loop You In" media event - the 9.7-inch iPad Pro.

iFixit surmised that the new iPad Pro is essentially the offspring of the iPad Air 2 and 12.9-inch iPad Pro, acquiring the looks of the former and specs of the latter. The site found, however, that the 9.7-inch iPad Pro acquired the "ugly genes" of the family when it comes to its internals as Apple continues to cram ever more features into its devices at the cost of repair accessibility.

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Unlike the larger-screened iPad Pro, which houses its display cables in the center of the device, the 9.7-inch device has its display cables nestled into the bottom right edge of the case.

After disassembling the EMI shield covering the logic board, removing the battery, and moving onto the upper speakers, which connect to the logic board with spring contacts, iFixit discovered that most of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro's components are held together by "gobs of adhesive" that will make it difficult for everyday repairs.

The site also examined the protruding camera, which it notes is the same 12 MP camera found in the iPhone 6s Plus and an upgrade from the 12.9-inch version's 8 MP rear-facing camera. iFixit suggests the iPad Pro's camera is optically stabilized like the one in the iPhone 6s Plus, but Apple has not marketed the iPad Pro with support for optical image stabilization. Regardless, the beefed-up specs of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro's camera require the bump on the rear housing, which is not present on the 12.9-inch device.

iFixit iPad Pro 2
One of the wild cards of the teardown centered around a group of antenna interconnect boards, which iFixit determined to "serve no actual purpose." Upon closer inspection, the site hypothesized that the sturdy, flat tops of the boards perhaps provide extra support for the iPad's display, which could come in handy since users with Apple Pencils are bound to rest their palms on the display repeatedly.

After inspecting a similar A9X 64-bit processor, iFixit compared the battery capacities of the recent line of iPads to the new iPad Pro. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro's 7,306 mAh is expectedly less than the 12.9-inch iPad Pro's score of 10,307 mAh, but largely in line with the 7,340 mAh of the iPad Air 2. Despite their varying capacities, iFixit noted that all three of the iPads have "roughly the same estimated battery life" of about 10 hours.

iFixit gave the 9.7-inch iPad Pro a repairability score of 2 out of 10, with a 10 being the easiest to repair. The disassemblers noted that with the removal of the pull tabs found under the battery in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, a "virtually impossible to replace" Smart Connector, the fused-together LCD and front panel glass, and a more-than-average amount of adhesive holding everything together, the smaller iPad Pro is even more difficult to repair than its larger counterpart, which scored a 3 out of 10 in the same test.
Apple's newest iPad Pro, the 9.7-inch model, made its way into the hands of customers on March 31, and now that a day has passed, many people who purchased the powerful little tablet have shared their thoughts on the device on our forums.

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Reviews and impressions from media sites came out earlier this month, but there are always new details and small tidbits of information that come out when products see a wide release. First impressions from actual Apple consumers can also be valuable for those considering a purchase, so we've gathered up some of the details MacRumors readers have shared about the 9.7-inch iPad Pro.

A thread querying users about their happiness level with the new iPad Pro suggests opinions on the device are largely positive. More than half of respondents said the device is "amazing" or a "great upgrade." While some are upgrading from an iPad Air 2 or earlier, there are buyers who traded their 12.9-inch iPad Pros for the smaller models. MacRumors reader Traverse outlined a long list of positives about his iPad Pro, highlighting the speed improvements over the iPad Air 2.

ipadproheader
Noticeably faster performance than my Air 2. I loved the Air 2 and never thought of it as slow and expected the A9X to yield no real world benefit in day to day use. I think a combination of that and the NAND flash improvements are huge. Apps install faster, many app launches are noticeably faster. The Music app is nearly instant open whereas the Air 2 took 2-3 seconds. I set up my iPad as new and launched Sky Guide for the first time by accident when I was putting it's widget in NC and by the time NC swiped up the app was already loaded and waiting :eek:. It's noticeable more zippy.
The True Tone display, unique to the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, is getting some rave reviews, but not all iPad Pro owners are fans of the yellowing of the display. Patriot24 says it's "insanely great," but BitSlap says he prefers bright and crisp whites. On the whole, most readers seem to like the feature quite a bit.

➜ Click here to read rest of article...
It's just after 9:30a.m. in New Zealand, which means the first customers who ordered an iPhone SE or a 9.7-inch iPad Pro on March 24 are starting to receive their shipments. Soon, customers in Australia will begin receiving their devices, and the first Apple retail stores in the country will open for in-store sales.

New Zealanders have already started photos and news of their devices on social networks like Instagram, reddit, and Twitter, and a few lucky customers who ordered the 9.7-inch iPad Pro in the United States have also been receiving early shipments, as noted on Instagram, Twitter, and the MacRumors forums.

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Image via Instagram user Jamesreb

As March 31 hits around the world, the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro will be available in first wave launch countries that include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Singapore, the UK, US Virgin Islands, and the US. Retail stores in these countries will be opening at approximately 9:00 a.m. local time, letting customers make walk-in purchases.

Customers in these countries who already placed an order for a new device will begin receiving those devices as soon as shipping outlets begin work in the morning, likely around 8:00 a.m. local time. Following deliveries in Australia and New Zealand, customers in Japan, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore will receive their devices, followed by deliveries in France, Germany, and the UK, and then orders will arrive in Canada, the US, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands.

In the United States, pre-order customers living on the east coast should begin receiving their shipments starting at 8:00 a.m. local time from couriers like FedEx and UPS in approximately 18 hours. Orders set to arrive on March 31 have already shipped from Apple using Next Day shipping.

Big box retailers like Walmart, Target, and Best Buy will begin in-store sales of the iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro starting on the morning of March 31, as well carriers like AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon.

In the United States, the iPhone SE is priced at $399 for 16GB and $499 for 64GB. Orders placed today from Apple's online store will be delivered starting on April 13.

Pricing on the 9.7-inch iPad Pro starts at $599 for a 32GB Wi-Fi only model and goes up to $1,029 for a 256GB Wi-Fi + Cellular model. Orders placed today from the online store will be delivered starting next week.
Apple last week announced the new 9.7-inch iPad Pro, which marketing chief Phil Schiller described as the "ultimate upgrade" for both existing iPad and Windows PC users. Nearly one week later, a number of in-depth reviews have surfaced that offer a closer look at the new tablet beyond last week's first impressions and hands-on articles.

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Apple's new 9.7" iPad Pro, right, next to the 12.9" version (Image: Ars Technica)

The general consensus among early reviews is that the smaller iPad Pro has powerful hardware, but like its 12.9-inch sibling, opinions were mixed about whether the tablet can truly replace your laptop. From $599, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is certainly a more affordable Mac or PC alternative over the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, which starts at $799.

Andrew Cunningham for Ars Technica:
When I reviewed the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, I said that I was having trouble envisioning the type of user who would choose it over a “real” computer like a MacBook Air or Pro. I still feel the same way today. The full-size Pro is large enough and expensive enough that you could buy any number of high-end Macs or Windows PCs for the same price, and you wouldn’t have to put up with the potentially frustrating limitations of iOS. […]

The equation is a little different for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, which is both smaller and cheaper. […] At $599 (plus the cost of accessories), this tablet is competing more against midrange Windows PCs, and it’s substantially cheaper than any MacBook that Apple offers. For many active but less-demanding users, the strength of the hardware and the relative simplicity of the software could be enough to recommend it, though for the time being there are things that regular old Windows PCs are just better at than iOS is (including running legacy apps and connecting to just about anything that needs a standard USB port). It really depends on how you work and what you need to do. […]

If you've already got an iPad and are looking for a newer one, the math is a little simpler. If you have an iPad 2, the third- or fourth-generation Retina iPads, or the original iPad Air and you find yourself using your iPad more often than whatever other computer you have in your house, the iPad Pro is a no-brainer upgrade.

Lance Ulanoff for Mashable:
The best flagship iPad you can buy is now the 9.7-inch iPad Pro. […]

It’s kind of mind-blowing how much power there is in this lightweight tablet.

Benchmark numbers are just as good as the ones I saw on the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, despite the fact that the 9.7-inch iPad Pro has half as much RAM (2GB versus 4 GB on the 12.9-inch iPad Pro). […]

Did Apple just raise the price of the best iPad? Yes, it did. Is it worth it? When you consider the components and storage in the $599, 9.7-inch iPad Pro, absolutely.
David Phelan for The Independent:
The new Pro also has a keyboard to go with it, attached by the Smart Connector buttons on the tablet's edge. […]

And it turns the iPad Pro into an extremely effective laptop alternative, complete with touchscreen, unlike Apple's own laptops. In fact, the touchscreen works so well with the iPad Pro and keyboard, it's hard to think Apple isn't considering making a MacBook with touch-sensitive display. We’ll see. […]

But the real reason this is the best iPad yet built is because it combines a stunning display, stonking audio and relentless processing power into a tablet that’s supremely portable.

Rene Ritchie for iMore:
This can still be your everyday iPad, and better so than ever, but it can also be your ultra-mobile productivity machine, with little in the way of compromises. Sure, you lose some display and keyboard real estate, but you gain portability and an excellent camera system.

For people who've had a 9.7-inch iPad for a while but haven't seen a need to upgrade, and for those with aging Windows system looking for a modern alternative, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro will be compelling.
The new 9.7-inch iPad Pro has been available to order since March 24, with shipments beginning on March 31.
Apple is now accepting orders for the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro through its online storefront and through the Apple Store app. Orders are available in first wave launch countries including Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Singapore, the UK, US Virgin Islands, and the US.

All of the major U.S. carriers, Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile are accepting orders for the iPhone SE. Most carriers will start accepting orders at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time, but T-Mobile will not accept orders until 5:00 a.m. Pacific Time. Big box retailers like Best Buy, Walmart, and Target will sell both the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, but it is not clear if the stores will offer orders on 3/24.

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There have been no rumors pointing towards supply constraints, and as the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro both use components from earlier devices, we expect supplies to be plentiful and readily available. Ordering as soon as possible is still recommended, however, especially when it comes to accessories like the Smart Keyboard. With the launch of the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, the Smart Keyboard was in short supply.

The iPhone SE is available in Silver, Gold, Space Gray, and Rose Gold, in 16 and 64GB capacities. Pricing starts at $399 for an outright purchase of the 16GB model, while the 64GB model costs $499. Customers can purchase the device on a payment plan with 24 monthly payments as low as $13.30 through a carrier or $0 down through a two-year contract.

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Through Apple's own Upgrade Program, monthly payments on the iPhone SE can be as low as $10 for 24 months with the trade-in of an iPhone 5s. Older devices can also be traded in with Apple offering $12/month payments with the trade in of an iPhone 5 or 5c and $14/month payments with the trade in of an iPhone 4 or 4s.

Apple's 9.7-inch iPad Pro is available in Silver, Gold, Space Gray, and Rose Gold, a color that hasn't been offered in an iPad before. It is available in 32, 128, and 256GB capacities for $599, $749, and $899, respectively. Wi-Fi + Cellular models in the same capacities are available for an additional $130.

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For details on the capabilities and features of the two new devices, make sure to take a look at our iPhone SE and iPad Pro roundups.

Deliveries for iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro orders placed today will start next Thursday, on March 31. That is also the date when the two products will be available in Apple retail stores.
Apple has taken its online storefront down in order to prepare for the launch of iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro orders, which will likely begin at 12:01 a.m. Pacific Time or 3:01 a.m. Eastern Time on Thursday, March 24. Orders will be available on Apple's site, through the Apple Store app, and through carrier websites.

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Apple will accept orders for the two devices in first wave launch countries that include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Singapore, the UK, US Virgin Islands, and the US.

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The iPhone SE is available in 16 and 64GB capacities in the United States, with pricing that starts at $399 for an outright purchase. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro is available in 32, 128, and 256GB capacities with prices that start at $599. Both Wi-Fi and Cellular models are available.

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Supplies of the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro are likely to be adequate and we do not expect the devices to sell out. Nevertheless, customers planning to purchase should do so right away just in case.

Deliveries on orders placed today are expected to begin on March 31, which is also the day when the two devices will be available for in-store purchase.
Apple never announces the RAM in its iOS devices, so that metric often remains a mystery until a device teardown or benchmarking tests. TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino has an iPhone SE and a new iPad Pro on hand, and was able to use a memory checking app to determine the RAM in both devices.

Based on his testing, it appears that both the iPhone SE and the 9.7-inch iPad Pro include 2GB of RAM.

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2GB RAM puts the iPhone SE on par with the iPhone 6s and the iPhone 6s Plus, both of which also include 2GB of RAM. As for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, 2GB RAM means its performance isn't going to measure up to the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, which is equipped with 4GB RAM.

As was recently discovered, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro also features a slightly underclocked A9X processor, another factor that will impact its performance compared to the larger tablet.

Geekbench testing by Panzarino suggests the iPhone SE is not underlocked compared to the iPhone 6s, with the A9 in the device running at 1.85GHz. On the test, the iPhone SE received a single-core score of 2538 and a multi-core score of 4421, on par with or slightly better than tests conducted on the iPhone 6s.

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Given that it includes the same processor and the same RAM, the iPhone SE is as powerful as the iPhone 6s despite its much smaller form factor and lower price. The new iPad Pro, while less powerful than its larger sibling, has its own unique features, including a 12 megapixel camera with rear flash and a unique True Tone display.
The new 9.7-inch iPad Pro adopts the same powerful dual-core 64-bit A9X chip that was first introduced in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, but the two tablets are not on par when it comes to performance. Based on information on Apple's website, it appears the A9X in the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is slightly underclocked compared to the A9X in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro (via AppleInsider).

On its iPad comparison page, Apple lists the specs of the A9X in both of the iPad Pros, comparing them to the A7 chip in the iPad Air, iPad mini 2/3, and iPhone 5s. The 12.9-inch iPad Pro lists a 2.5x faster CPU and 5x faster graphics, while the 9.7-inch iPad Pro lists a 2.4x faster CPU and 4.3x faster graphics.

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Apple has a history of underclocking the chips used in smaller devices. The iPad mini 2 and the iPad Air both used the same A7 chip, but while the iPad Air clocked in at 1.4GHz, the iPad mini 2 ran at 1.3GHz.

It's likely Apple is underclocking the A9X chip in the 9.7-inch iPad Pro due to its smaller body, which may be unable to dissipate heat as well as the larger 12.9-inch iPad Pro, The performance difference between the two tablets is likely to be unnoticeable in real world conditions, and even underclocked, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is offering some significant performance improvements over the 9.7-inch iPad Air 2.

Aside from the slightly lower clock speed, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro has several features that set it above the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, including a 12-megapixel camera with a rear flash and a new True Tone display feature that adjusts the screen's temperature based on ambient lighting.

The 9.7-inch iPad Pro will be available for order starting this Thursday, with in-store availability and shipments starting the following Thursday, on March 31. Pricing for the new iPad Pro starts at $599.

Update: Geekbench benchmark testing conducted by TechCrunch's Matthew Panzarino suggests the A9X processor in the 9.7-inch iPad Pro runs at 2.16GHz, compared to 2.24GHz in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro.

The new iPad Pro received a single-core score of 3022 and a multi-core score of 5107. In comparison, the 12.9-inch iPad Pro sees average scores of 3224 on the single-core test and 5466 on the multi-core test. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro may not be quite as powerful as the 12.9-inch model, but it did significantly outperform the iPhone 6s and the iPad Air 2 on the Geekbench test.